Olympic Fever

Sochi 2014

Sochi 2014

images-1I love the Olympics!  It doesn’t matter the nation, sport or season, every two years I get obsessed.  If you’re calling me to go out, don’t bother; if you want to spend time with me, park it on the couch and no talking except during commercial breaks!  When the two weeks are up, the torch extinguished and regular snoozefest programming returns, I literally slump.  Several of my friends also go through the Post-Olympic depression knowing that many cool sports, that we’ve become addicted to, like Bi-athalon and Snowboard-Cross, we just won’t see for another four years.  The separation is difficult.

But the great thing I find about each and every Olympics is how much harder I begin to train in my own workouts.  That’s not to say that I get delusions of grandeur and start pumping iron five days a week, three hours a day.  It’s simply watching graceful individuals with purpose, dedication and discipline inspire me to emulate those qualities within myself and it starts coming out in my workouts first.  It’s not that I consciously even intend to work harder and better; but I get to the end of my planned workout and I have given it my all and it has left me in a better place than when I started.Unknown

It’s true that the Olympics like church is often beset by scandal, corruption and politics.  But the true Olympic spirit burns so brightly that it casts all those petty incidents into the shadows and the world is drawn together in a celebration of camaraderie and the best we have to offer each other.  It doesn’t matter that I can’t pronounce the name of the athlete who just went off pace by a fraction of a second and is brought to tears, my heart breaks just the same.  I yell encouraging “coach-like words” from my perch on my cushions as I see two athletes battling it out, both exemplary and both flawless – it doesn’t matter that they don’t speak my language or that they can’t hear me through the screen.  The elation I feel as I do a victory lap around my living room having just watched someone achieve absolute perfection and a world record leaves me feeling like I’ve just won the gold.  It doesn’t matter if they’re from my home or not.Unknown-1

This great spectacle of empathy allows us to celebrate the triumphs and lows of the individual, but it draws us together in one world of experience.  And that is magical!  And while I will be sad when the closing ceremonies turn the lights out on the athletes partying on the stadium floor, I will have been enriched by witnessing others strive to be their absolute best, not just to themselves, but to their fellow competitors, to the dogs of Sochi and to the human race!Unknown-2

Fitness Apps

Brain vs. App

Brain vs. App

A mechanic friend of mine is fond of saying, “The computer is not the brain.  The computer is a tool for the mechanic’s brain.”  Sure there are a lot of really cool new fitness apps and new-fangled techno gear all claiming to give you the best workout.  But how good can it be when that same workout has also been given to literally thousands of other people?

Each person has their own strengths and weaknesses and their own quirky habits and patterns, some good, some bad. A fitness app should not be a replacement for a coach, trainer or therapist. It is a tool to help you get to be your best self.  And there are some really groovy tools (check out UP24 by Jawbone.) https://jawbone.com/up

Think of it this way: think of how much information is stored in your computer.  It’s unlikely

App = Tool

App = Tool

that you will ever use all the information available to you.  To that end, an app can help support your efforts to change behaviors but it is a tool not a brain.  The trainer, coach or therapist is the brain! They thrive on dorking out on sport sciences. They absorb all these areas of expertise and then tailor select information to a program that is perfect and effective for you!  They will then likely suggest apps that help you stay on track with the areas you want to change.

I’m not saying everyone should run out and spend money that you don’t have on an Olympic level coach, but as anyone who’s tried to navigate the software service of a utility company, finding a human with the answers is what you really want!

Sochi 2014

Sochi 2014

Think about pro level athletes: they use high tech tools every day but you don’t see any of them showing up to Sochi armed with only an app on their phone.  An app cannot identify a structural imbalance or a flaw in technique or a faulty movement pattern.  An app cannot see your face when you start to struggle and give you the encouragement to keep going.  An app cannot help you stretch or massage a closed joint capsule or strained muscle.  An app can remind you to eat better, can track your sleeping habits and can show you data documenting your improvements.

Consider using a trainer, coach or therapist AND an app!  You don’t have to train with someone three times a week; it could be once a week for eight weeks or once a month for a checkup/update.  Maybe you could train with your best friend for a half hour a week?  But know there are a lot of options, more so when you use your apps + your humans as a team.  Get good at using your tools to lift you to VICTORY.

Link

http://www.everydayhealth.com/heart-health/heart-disease-on-the-rise.aspx?xid=aol_eh-cardio_2_20131021_&aolcat=ESR&ncid=webmail30″ title=”Heart Disease On The Rise” target=”_blank”>

The Obesity Epidemic

For Tracy L. Stevens, MD, a cardiologist in the Saint Luke’s Health System in Kansas City, Mo., and a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association, at the top of the list of causes is that more Americans are overweight and too sedentary.

“A big thing is Americans, for the most part, have lost track of who is responsible for their health,” she said. “Americans think it’s someone else, and they don’t have that discipline every day to be on top of their risk factors.”

Hey Victory Fitness – Do you train kids? “Check”, Do you train adults? “Check”, Can you help me lose weight? “Check!” THEN LET’S DO THIS!

Why Train Everyone the Same?

8648876146_3df3e20120_nAttention fitness professionals: Why is there such a focus and an assumption that everyone on the planet should or wants to look like a Navy Seal?!  Over and over I see fitness professionals trying to “motivate” people by putting them through the same paces an athlete goes through. But the truth of the situation is that 1) Most athletes are bit on the nutty scale psychologically, myself included – how else could I have completely ripped my hamstring off the bone but still went out for a pint with friends?! 2) Most athletes, including ex-military pay a price for pushing their bodies so hard. Ask any paratrooper over 50 how their knees and back feel on most days. 3) The general population can benefit greatly by exercise, but are “boot camp” and “cross-fit” style workouts appropriate? I see fitness professionals trying their best to motivate but without a good sense of how they are being perceived.  To a die-hard gym rat, these high energy classes seem like “fun.” But to the person who is shy, weak and uncomfortable with their body this approach can look like a coked-out 80’s aerobic instructor or a tatted up Russian UFC fighter – neither is going to be terribly successful on enticing the people who really need our help!

If we truly want to practice what we preach as fitness professionals, that our goals are to help people have better day to day health and to reach physical and mental goals previously thought to be unattainable, then we must stop trying to expect everyone to be the same or to be motivated the same way.  We must stop putting the average client through workouts that we would find exhilarating and rather begin where they are.

I do believe that every person can train to their individual highest level.  But the job of the trainer is to shore up the weak spots and develop that individual’s best skills.  Imagine if you were putting together an elite team.  Yes, you would want everyone’s base level of conditioning to be up to the level that will be demanded in the game.  But you wouldn’t take your fastest guy and make him your blocker.  Nor if you needed an agile, swift and light person would you send in the strongman competitor.

If we want to create better health in the nations, we have to do it via good management.  Adaptable training can serve all people successfully – but the trainers’ need to shift approach to make that elite team happen!